Blast Golf Putting 

  • 3D sensor communicates via Bluetooth to the app which stores data in Blast Connect
  • Self-calibration recognizes swings and strokes automatically, filtering out practice swings and other actions, for example, raking next ball into place
  • Online, offline & video capture modes
  • The goal is for the technology to disappear, put sensor on club and go play
  • Wireless charging via the charging pad with an 8-hour continuous battery life

Timing & Tempo

It is commonly accepted that a 2:1 tempo is important in creating a consistent putting stroke, however what’s more important is to arrive at that 2:1 tempo with a consistent timing signature. Just because a series of strokes repeat a 2:1 tempo, does not mean those strokes have had consistent, repetitive timing pattern. Consider the 2:1 timing pattern of Snedeker vs. Crenshaw. For that reason, it’s important to work on Back and Forward Stroke Timing consistency first, then Tempo, for sustainable success. 

Backstroke Time

The best players in the world repeat their backstroke timing to within 2/100ths (.02) of a second, and to accomplish this we can adjust either the length of the backstroke, or the speed of the backstroke. The ideal Backstroke time is .60 seconds.

Forward Stroke Time

The best players in the world repeat their forward stroke timing to within 2/100ths (.02) of a second, and to accomplish this we can adjust either the length of the forward stroke (based on the backstroke length), or the speed of the forward stroke. The ideal Forward Stroke time is .30 seconds.

Other Metrics

Rotation

Squaring up the clubface at impact is critical to starting your ball on the intended line. The back rotation, forward rotation and rotation change metrics tell us how much we are opening the clubface from address to the top of the backswing, closing from the top of the backswing to impact, and the net difference between these two measurements. We like to see no more than .5 degrees of difference between the back rotation and forward rotation. Ideally we’re seeing about half a degree of back rotation for every inch of stroke length.

Stroke length:

We frequently see too long of a stroke for the amount of energy needed to be delivered to the golf ball, and measuring stroke length allows us to identify what the proper length is for a given distance putt. Shortening the stroke length frequently helps to prohibit deceleration into the golf ball, and therefore helps with distance control.